Worker’s eagle eye saves 2 tiny kittens at the landfill

Landon and Phil, two male kittycats, were located amongst garbage at Prima Deshecha Garbage Dump in San Juan Capistrano. (Thanks To Orange Area Waste and also Recycling)

Selwyn Weinert, a garbage assessor for OC Waste & & Recycling, detected a number of tiny black rats as a trash truck discarded its tons. Approximately he believed.

Instead, the little black fur rounds were 2 male kittens, regarding 3 weeks old as well as the dimension of a huge iPhone. They were discovered among the lots of trash as well as the cacophony of equipment at the Prima Deshecha Garbage Dump in San Juan Capistrano on Wednesday, Oct. 10.

They’ve been called Landon and also Phil, riffing off where they were found. “It prevails to see rats and also other animals that are not normally domesticated,” OC Waste & & R spokesperson Kristina Hamm claimed. “This is very rare.” Where Landon and Phil originate from is a secret, except that the truck chose them up in Orange Area.

“It’s a needle in a haystack,” Hamm stated of snooping the tiny kitties in the stacks of garbage.

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Is that John Mayer singing in the tunnel at Salt Creek Beach? No, it’s Will Campisano

  • A passerby misses the mark as he attempts to toss money into the guitar situation of Willam Campisano. The Dana Hills High pupil has actually been busking in the Salt Creek passage for the past year. (Photo by Costs Alkofer, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High.
    School student, has been vocal singing and also playing his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel for the past year. (Picture by Expense Alkofer, Contributing Digital Photographer).

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  • William Campisano draws the focus of a couple taking their canines for a go through the Salt Creek passage. Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee, has actually been singing and playing his guitar in the tunnel for the previous year. (Photo by Expense Alkofer, Contributing Photographer).

  • William Campisano is ringed with lights as he plays his guitar in the Salt Creek passage on a Sunday evening. Campisano, a Dana Hills High student, has been vocal singing as well as playing his guitar in the passage for the past year Ñ nearly every weekend break for about 5-6 hours. Campisano has actually acquired a great deal of area interest and this summertime participated in a program at Berkeley University of Music and won a songwriting competition. (Photo by Costs Alkofer, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, plays his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel as the sun sets over the Pacific Sea on a Sunday mid-day. Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has been vocal singing and also playing the guitar in the Salt Creek passage for the past year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High student plays his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel on a Sunday afternoon. Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee, has been singing as well as playing guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel for the past year. (Picture by Expense Alkofer, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • William Campisano draws the attention of a couple of boys who were going through the Salt Creek passage on a Sunday afternoon. Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has actually been singing and also playing his guitar in the passage for the past year. (Image by Bill Alkofer, Adding Digital Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee plays his guitar in the Salt Creek passage on a Sunday afternoon. Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has been singing as well as playing guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel for the previous year. (Image by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee, has been vocal singing and playing his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel for the past year. (Image by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • A team of web surfers walk previous William Campisano as he plays his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel on a Sunday afternoon.
    Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has actually been singing as well as playing his guitar in the tunnel for the past year Ñ almost every weekend for concerning 5-6 hours prior to sundown. (Picture by Costs Alkofer, Adding Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High student plays his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel as the sun sets over the Pacific Sea on a Sunday afternoon. Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee, has actually been singing and also playing guitar in the tunnel for the previous year Ñ practically every weekend break for concerning 5-6 hrs prior to sundown. (Picture by Bill Alkofer, Adding Digital Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee plays his guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel on a Sunday mid-day. Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee, has been singing and playing guitar in the Salt Creek tunnel for the past year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • William Campisano, a Dana Hills High trainee plays his guitar in the Salt Creek passage on a Sunday mid-day. Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has been singing and also playing guitar in the Salt Creek passage for the past year Ñ nearly every weekend break for about 5-6 hours every day prior to sundown.
    ( Image by Costs Alkofer, Adding Digital Photographer).

  • A girl passing William Campisano drops some modification in his guitar instance as Campisano busks in the Salt Creek tunnel on a Sunday mid-day. Campisano, a Dana Hills High pupil, has actually been vocal singing and playing his guitar in the tunnel for the past year. (Picture by Costs Alkofer, Contributing Photographer).

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DANA FACTOR &http://#8212; &http://#8212; Will Campisano has actually enjoyed songs many of his life. Now he’s sharing that love with others, in a rather unorthodox setting.

At sunset every Friday, Saturday and Sunday the Dana Hills Secondary school senior sings as well as plays his guitar inside the tunnel at Salt Creek Coastline. A singer-songwriter, Campisano’s arsenal ranges from Juvenile Gambino to Eric Clapton, in addition to some original songs.

Whether its pet dog pedestrians, joggers or internet users, audience response has been extremely favorable.

Campisano has actually played for bride-to-bes going through the passage on their means to their coastline wedding celebration; he’s been asked to serenade proposals; as well as he’s assisted celebrate birthday celebrations and anniversaries.

” A whole lot of his ideas comes from the regional neighborhood,” said Ray Medina, director of vocals at South Orange Area College of the Arts at Dana Hills High. “It becomes part of the material of who he is and also he feels comfy there. Individuals anticipate to see him there now &http://#8212; &http://#8212; it becomes part of

his identity.” The idea to sing in the legendary coastline passage &http://#8212; which last year obtained a remodeling mural from another Dana Hills High trainee — — was sparked greater than a year earlier.

Campisano and some of his friends — — then participants of a hair salon quartet — went there one night when nobody was around to see what their vocals would certainly seem like. They located the tunnel had ideal acoustics, enhancing the noise of their instruments as well as voices.

After Campisano’s good friends went on to university, he decided to go it alone at the passage — — just him and his guitar.” It transformed right into something extra than just a leisure activity,” stated Campisano, 18. “Within the very first month, a new bride walked with and asked me to bet her wedding celebration. I sang all the Ed Sheeran tracks I understood, and was included in their wedding celebration photos. I believe I made their day much better; they certainly made mine. I took this event as a sign that this was my calling.”

Given that October 2017, Campisano has actually played in the passage 3 evenings a week, virtually each week. When he executes, he draws a group.

” I’m still invariably enlivened when complete unfamiliar people hang out as well as sing with me; when old pairs dance in the moonlight as I croon Frank Sinatra; when friendly musicians pass by as well as play together with me till dark,” he claimed.

Influenced by Harry Potter, John Mayer

Campisano started playing piano at age 6 but didn’t sing until intermediate school when he started taking part in musical comedy and choir. He continued right into senior high school and also found out to play guitar after being cast as Harry Potter in “An Extremely Potter Music.” The role, he claimed, required him to serenade the dragon on guitar.

” I made a decision to learn just how to play guitar as well as since after that, I’ve never placed it down,” he said.

However his greatest inspiration is singer-songwriter John Mayer.

” He’s one of the very best — — otherwise greatest guitar players of our generation and also his songwriting and also his work has a very individual insight right into the globe,” Campisano said. “To me, an excellent artist is a person who can evoke emotional response out of a person only with their work and also every single time I pay attention to John Mayer, I feel enthusiastic concerning songs.”

Tips spend for official training

By the beginning of summertime, Campisano had accumulated $6,000 in suggestions for his tunnel efficiencies. He utilized the cash to spend for a five-week summer season training course at Berklee University of Songs in Boston, where he and also several hundred other pupils studied songs theory and also joined performance classes.

There, Campisano was amongst 30 trainees — — out of 300 — that passed their auditions in a singer-songwriter competition.

” I reached carry out with my fellow songwriters in a collection of displays where we played our songs onstage. I was impressed with the various other trainees in this competitors. I discovered exactly how they composed their music as well as obtained an entire new point of view on writing.”

Strategies for the future

Currently in his senior year at Dana Hills High, Campisano, who has a 4.1 quality point standard, is associated with arts at institution. He has a leading role in the institution’s manufacturing of “The 25th Yearly Putnam County Punctuation Bee,” which opens up Dec. 6, as well as he belongs to the Dana Hills Improv Group.

The Laguna Niguel local also is busy submitting university applications to locations such as Berklee University of Music, USC, Yale and also Harvard. He intends to study music efficiency — — something he says he wants to spend the remainder of his life doing.

Meanwhile, he’s working to increase his performance schedule with jobs around town at local restaurants.

Medina said he appreciates Campisano’s skills, particularly his storytelling abilities.

” That’s what establishes him apart from the remainder,” he claimed. “I would certainly compare Will to somebody like Carole King. He takes his experiences and places them to pen and paper and informs stories in a means that moves people.”

While he waits for his break, or until he goes away to institution, Campisano intends to maintain singing in the tunnel at Salt Creek Coastline.

” I simply desire to make people delighted by playing there,” he said. “I desire everybody to enjoy themselves, have a great time, as well as take pleasure in the beach as high as I do. I want everyone to recognize whatever’s going to be ALRIGHT since it has to be. I also desire to inspire anybody that makes any kind of type of art and for them to know that it most definitely has an area in society, as well as is a gorgeous thing to show to the general public.”

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‘Poolees’ train at San Clemente gym in preparation for Marine Corps boot camp

SAN CLEMENTE — — If you intend to be part of the “Few and the Proud,” it’s not as easy as simply subscribing.

On Saturday, Oct. 13, 50 males and also ladies — — that subscribed to end up being U.S. Marines as part of the Postponed Entry Program — — got some additional inspiration.

  • USMC employer Staff Sgt. Kelly Schaefer, right, views while Jacob Smith of San Clemente lifts a weight above his head at the OC Athletix fitness center in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018, where about 50 local senior high school students, that prepare to become Marines after graduating, exercised with each other under the guidance of USMC employers. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Digital Photographer).

  • USMC recruiter Personnel Sgt. Kelly Schaefer, left, searches while senior high school pupils from around Orange Region, that intend to come to be Marine employees after finishing, do different workouts at the OC Athletix gym in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Adding Photographer).

  • SoundThe gallery will certainly resume inseconds
  • A group of pupils from local secondary schools that intend to go into the USMC after finishing exercise together, with guideline from USMC recruiters, at the OC Athletix gym in San Clemente on Saturday early morning. October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer).

  • Daniel Simon of Lake Woodland brings a pair of kettlebells while doing an organized exercise with other USMC recruits, regarding 50 trainees from local senior high schools, at the OC Athletics fitness center in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Adding Photographer).

  • Alex Madrid of Irvine draws him self up on a pull-up bar while exercising with various other neighborhood high institution trainees that plan to enter the USMC after finishing at the OC Athletix fitness center in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Picture By Jeff Antenore, Adding Photographer).

  • A team of students from regional secondary schools that plan to get in the USMC after finishing pay attention to instructions in a rain-soaked car park outside of OC Athletix in San Clemente where they functioned out with employers on Saturday morning. October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • Bryce Pierce of Lake Forest, one of regarding 50 regional high school pupils that joined an organized exercise for kids that prepare to join the USMC after graduating, touches a cone while doing wind sprints in a rain-soaked parking area beyond the OC Athletix gym in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Digital Photographer).

  • Zhihao Chen of Irvine prepares to flip a giant tire while doing an organized workout with various other USMC recruits, regarding 50 pupils from local high colleges, at the OC Athletics health club in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer).

  • A group of pupils from regional secondary schools that plan to get in the USMC after finishing exercise together, with guideline from USMC employers, at the OC Athletix health club in San Clemente on Saturday morning. October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Adding Photographer).

  • Erica Colon-Perez, co-owner of the OC Athletix fitness center in San Clemente, demonstrates exactly how to, as well as exactly how not to, do certain exercises throughout an exercise for potential young Militaries on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Adding Digital Photographer).

  • Bank Employee Ramirez of Objective Viejo hoists a weight above his head throughout Saturday early morning’s organized exercise for local pupils who intend to get in the USMC after senior high school at the OC Athletix health club in San Clemente on October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • Ana Ung of Irvine, who intends to go into the USMC after finishing secondary school, grasps a heavy sandbag while functioning out with various other prospective Marine hires at the OC Athletix gym in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Digital Photographer).

  • OC Athletix co-owner Manuel Perez gives directions to a team of about 50 regional high college students during a workout organized for possible Marine recruits on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Picture By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer).

  • A group of USMC employers, that arranged an exercise to aid regional senior high school trainees prepare to come to be Marine employees, stand outside the OC Athletix health club in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Adding Digital Photographer).

  • Bryce Pierce of Lake Forest, one of about 50 neighborhood secondary school students who signed up with an organized exercise for kids that plan to join the USMC after graduating, prepares to turn a huge tire in a rain-soaked parking area beyond the OC Athletix fitness center in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Professional Photographer).

  • OC Athletix co-owner Manuel Perez provides directions to a group of regarding 50 neighborhood senior high school pupils during a workout arranged for potential Marine recruits on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Adding Photographer).

  • Josh Cuevas of Lake Forest trips a stationary bicycle while exercising with various other regional senior high school pupils that intend to enter the USMC after graduating at the OC Athletix fitness center in San Clemente on Saturday, October 13, 2018. (Image By Jeff Antenore, Adding Digital Photographer).

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The pupils, each recruited through the Marine Corps Recruit Station in Goal Viejo, got a dose of high-intensity training at OC Athletix. They did a 90-minute circuit where they ran, did push-ups, pull-ups, bows, sit-ups, as well as raised weights. They also turned tires and kept up loaded sandbags.

The training is component of a yearlong initiative to get into shape to end up being a Marine hire.

Pupils who enlist in the Postponed Access Program are called poolees, Marine Corps vernacular for a “pool of employees.”

The poolees have actually experienced the enlistment procedure, taken their tests as well as have been sworn in after finalizing their agreement. Now, they’re waiting to obtain their date to go to the 13-week hire training and also most likely to boot camp.

Before delivering out, every poolee needs to pass a Preliminary Toughness Test. The minimum requirements for passing are 2 pull-ups; 35 sit-ups in two minutes; and a 1.5-mile run in 13 mins, 30 seconds for males; a bent arm hang for 12 seconds; 35 sit-ups in two minutes; as well as a one-mile run in 10 minutes, 30 seconds for women.

The San Clemente health club, co-founded by Manuel Colon-Perez, is among several in Orange County where Marine employers collaborate with their poolees.

Poolee training can be physical &http://#8212; &http://#8212; such as at the health club &http://#8212; or they may exercise Marine Corps drill activities, learn Marine Corps background or check out Camp Pendleton to see Militaries.

” I understand what they’ll need to be successful,” stated Colon-Perez, who offered at Camp Pendleton from 2002 to 2012. “I see some of these youngsters and believe. &http://#8216;&http://#8216; Come below pal, allow’s give you an example of what you’ll go via.’ We provide a great deal of inspiration. I more than happy that we obtain to aid them. It additionally maintains me linked to the Marine Corps.”

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Election 2018: San Clemente candidates share their priorities and thoughts on local issues

Voters in every city in Orange County will go to the polls Nov. 6 to pick who will represent them on the City Council and, in several cases, as mayor. Ahead of the election, all candidates were invited to share information about themselves and answer questions about their priorities and local concerns for this voter guide. In each city, all were asked the same questions and were limited to the same word count for their answers.

In San Clemente, 11 challengers and one incumbent are vying for three seats on the City Council.

Candidates

Dan Bane, 37, partner (danbanesc.com)

Don Brown, 75, retired (donbrownforcitycouncil.com)

Wayne Eggleston, director (eggleston4council.com)

Laura Ferguson, 51, executive assistant. to the city (of Encinitas) manager (lauraferguson4sc.com)

Gene James, 63, adjunct faculty member (genewalkerjames.com)

Jackson Hinkle, 19, energy policy advisor (ocstudents4citycouncil.org/hinkle4sc)

Mikii Rathmann, 48, owner/event planner (facebook.com/mikiiforsc)

Jake Rybczyk, 18, director of budget (ocstudents4citycouncil.org/jake-rybczyk)

Ed Ward, 58, divisional vice president (edward4sanclemente.com)

Kathy Ward, 57, incumbent, city council member (kathywardforcitycouncil2018.com)

Tiffany Joy Robson Leet (did not respond by deadline)

Bernie Wohlfarth (did not respond by deadline)

Question 1: What are your top two priorities if elected?

Dan Bane: I will continue to fight to stop the toll road at Oso Parkway. I’ve actively led the fight to keep the toll road from bisecting San Clemente by litigating against the TCA’s proposals in court, helping draft AB279, and by testifying in support of AB382. Additionally, I will focus on providing more sheriff’s deputies, updating the San Clemente substation, reinvigorating our Retired Senior Volunteer Program, and partnering with surrounding cities and public agencies.

Don Brown: My top Priority is stopping the Toll Road connection to the I-5 through our City. My second Priority is to increase the number of Sheriff Deputies to handle the surge of Homeless and increased crime in San Clemente. This problem has increased since the clearing of the Santa Ana riverbed. With the recent 9th Circuit ruling on Homeless and crime Classifications from Propositions 47/57 maintaining order has become extremely difficult. Increased Sheriff Deputies are needed.

Wayne Eggleston: Putting TCA out of business, and getting the nuclear waste at San Onofre moved.

Laura Ferguson: Enhance law enforcement services for our community and address homelessness. As our city has grown, the number of deputies have not kept pace. We need adequate staff to effectively address issues affecting our quality of life such as drug use, property crimes, loitering, and homeless and homeless encampments. Homelessness takes a toll on the economy, environment, health care and criminal justice systems, and quality of life. Our city can do more to collaborate with others.

Gene James: 1. Treat all citizens, taxpayers and city employees with respect and dignity; 2. Create a safe and secure environment for our families.

Jackson Hinkle: When I briefed members of Congress on decommissioning the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, they were shocked to learn that the canisters storing radioactive waste cannot be repaired, transported, or monitored, and that safety protocols at the plant are not being met. I will fight to ensure the safe storage of nuclear waste, move the waste off our coastline, implement a real-time, independent radiation monitoring system, and create an emergency action plan for San Clemente.

Cities all across Orange County are joining together in formal agreements to negotiate low-cost, clean energy contracts for their residents. This process, known as Community Choice Energy (CCE), is a system for governments to collectively bargain energy contracts for their citizens. CCE also generates funds that cities can allocate toward sustainability projects. There is no reason why San Clemente shouldn’t join in a partnership with neighboring cities to ensure affordable energy contracts for our residents.

Mikii Rathmann: Maintaining San Clemente’s quality of life and village character. It’s critical to protect our community from a toll road splitting us in two. To work with local agencies to dramatically reduce homelessness. As well as fostering an environment for local business owners to get things done and thrive!

Jake Rybczyk: My top two priorities are to do campaign finance reform by creating an individual contribution limit towards a campaign, and second, I would work to push SoCal Edison to adopt real-time independent monitoring in thicker canisters at SONGS.

Ed Ward: As a Councilmember representing the residents of San Clemente, I will steadfastly oppose any Tollroad Development and diligently pursue essential Public Safety initiatives. My focus on Public Safety will include optimization of the city’s annual investment in Police and Fire protection while including residents to publicly define a desperately-needed Homeless strategy. Additionally, we must partner with advocacy groups to effectively address the 3.6M pounds of nuclear waste stored at the decommissioned plant at San Onofre.

Kathy Ward: Stop the unnecessary toll road extension that will destroy my city and protect my city by removing nuclear waste and bringing back a hospital and emergency room.

Question 2: What’s your stance on the Transportation Corridor Agencies’ efforts to extend the 241 tollway?

Dan Bane: I’ve actively led the fight to keep the toll road from bisecting San Clemente by litigating against the TCA’s proposals, helping draft legislation to stop the toll road at Oso Parkway (AB2796), and by testifying in support of AB382. I will continue to work tirelessly to hold the TCA to its promise to pay down its bond indebtedness, make the toll roads free, and go out of business as intended.

Don Brown: The TCA’s efforts to connect the 241 to the I-5 through San Clemente will devastate our City. The Routes under consideration are not feasible. More importantly, recent studies by OCTA show that the 241 connection to I-5 is not needed. Extending the current HOV lanes 3 miles to the County line will handle demand until 2050. $1 Billion Managed lanes for weekend travel as proposed are ludicrous.

Wayne Eggleston: The extensive of the toll road is a non-starter. It will divide San Clemente, destroy homes, open space and part of the SCHS. We can not allow that to happen. Any agreement or lawsuit also needs to take into account that the toll road cannot end at La Pata which will harm the Talega Community. Additionally, we can not have toll lanes for an extension of 5 from Pico to the county line which will destroy homes and businesses. Gone will be the Presbyterian Church, Ralphs, many homes and businesses.

Laura Ferguson: I oppose a toll road through San Clemente. The TCA states it has 8 ideas it is studying, but alternative 14 is the worst because it would have devastating effects on our quality of life, environment, open space, wildlife, parkland, home values, and poses dangers being close to numerous schools. No other piece of the toll constructed so far has taken homes, and this final leg must not involve eminent domain of our established neighborhoods.

Gene James: My stance is simple and straightforward; I am steadfastly opposed. The TCA should payoff its debt, drop the tolls on the current toll roads and go out of business. No further explanation is required.

Jackson Hinkle: The unnecessary $2-billion toll road would be devastating for San Clemente and would worsen traffic on the I-5. The TCA’s motivation is not to “[enhance] mobility in Orange County” as per its mission statement, but to milk taxpayers for every ounce of profit they can muster. I will not only fight to dissolve the TCA, but also work with the OCTA and our residents to find modern, de-privatized solutions to streamline mobility for our community.

Mikii Rathmann: I do not support a toll road through San Clemente. To help ease some of the traffic issues faced in South County I would encourage the build out of arterial streets to extend Crown Valley Parkway to connect to the current 241 toll road, and construct an East-West arterial to extend LaPata.

Jake Rybczyk: I do not support the TCA and any of their efforts to create any toll roads. They are highly untrustworthy, being $6 billion dollars in debt, spending thousands on lobbying and doing illegal actions have in my opinion dictated them unnecessary and in need of being dissolved.

Ed Ward: I am committed to no Tollroad through San Clemente. Independent analysis has concluded that this roadway is unnecessary, and that existing Orange County Transit Authority plans (MPAH/M2) are sufficient to address South County traffic needs. I support further study regarding extensions to Las Patrones and La Pata (as included in the IBI study) as potential traffic relief options. The Tollroad is not needed, and I will oppose any Tollroad proposals while I represent this city.

Kathy Ward: TCA way overestimated future traffic levels. TCA has no viable extension and has no authority to plan or build lanes on I-5. That is a fact TCA is avoiding by wasting millions of dollars to study lanes they cannot build. It is the duty of the cities and the county to honor the agreement to close the agency, pay off the bonds, and make the roads free.

Question 3: What should the city’s role be in encouraging the development of low-income housing units? Would you support a mandate or an incentive of some kind?

Dan Bane: By law, every general plan in California is required to designate areas of affordable housing. While I don’t think Cities can afford to be responsible for building affordable housing, incentives are a viable option and cities should comply with state law while cooperating with developers working towards providing low-income housing units.

Don Brown: The City has a State approved Housing Element to our General Plan. Within this Mandated document low income housing goals and targets are stated and are in work. Additional funding incentives would be very beneficial in achieving this effort. Additionally, more assistance and incentives for Affordable Housing is needed. No ‘one size fits all’ Mandates will help. A flexible/locally tailored approach works best.

Wayne Eggleston: San Clemente already has many affordable housing units throughout the city and is in compliance with the State on this issue. We should never be mandated further, but incentives are really the key to provide affordable housing.

Laura Ferguson: There is a fair amount of affordable housing stock in San Clemente due to past city decisions to ensure residential developments include low-income units along with state laws placing demands on cities for affordable housing and to have Housing Element in compliance. As a municipality, I would not support a mandate but I would prioritize fast-tracking of approvals and permitting as long as the projects conformed to the city’s local development planning and zoning laws.

Gene James: I would not support a mandate to develop low-income housing in San Clemente. I am a committed capitalist who believes in an unregulated marketplace. Rather than meddling by government entities, it is my belief the private sector is vastly more equipped and qualified to solve the issue of low-income housing.

Jackson Hinkle: In a stable housing market, landlords and real estate investors nurse a healthy profit while tenants can expect rent increases that keep pace with inflation. This is not so in Orange County, where both sides of the equation are in a state of disequilibrium. I would encourage the expansion of affordable housing within our community, while holding the County accountable in providing our city with the resources we need to create incentives to do so.

Mikii Rathmann: Full, direct, and proactive communication from the city should be part of the process from the beginning in developing affordable housing, including permitting accessory dwelling units. The economic health of San Clemente would benefit from housing that is affordable to residents aging in place, and working families, close to their places of employment. Having a variety of housing opportunities makes a community dynamic, lively, and most importantly sustainable.

Jake Rybczyk: I think a city should encourage development of low-income housing through incentives and tax deductions. I believe low-income housing is needed to support a working democracy and economy and incentivizing that is the best way to ensure it happens successfully.

Ed Ward: As a business leader in the Senior Housing Industry, I would work to pursue Federal and State-available incentives to expand low-income housing capacity for qualified Seniors. Seniors represent roughly 15% of the population of San Clemente. These residents have built a life in this city, paid taxes, and those in need should have the opportunity to remain here despite income limitations.

Kathy Ward: Our city’s general plan and housing element requires the city to indicate parcels where affordable housing could be built. Our city already will consider higher density for projects that offer affordable housing units and I think where it is appropriate, higher density is reasonable to encourage development.

Question 4: Communities across the state are grappling with rising pension and other post-employment benefit costs. What do you think needs to be done to deal with this problem?

Dan Bane: No response

Don Brown: No response

Wayne Eggleston: No response

Laura Ferguson: No response

Gene James: In 16 years, CALPERS has gone from 100% funded to two thirds. We have two million public sector employees who are promised pensions and the system is failing. CALPERS is requiring increased contributions from cities; Stockton and San Bernardino have gone into bankruptcy as a result. For non-public safety jobs, future beneficiaries need to be moved to 401k programs. The CALPERS board needs to have members with acumen and experience to manage a $350B fund.

Jackson Hinkle: No response

Mikii Rathmann: No response

Jake Rybczyk: I think cities should set aside money to be put in a trust to fund pensions and cities should create plans to fully fund pensions. Workers are not at fault for rising pensions, cities have to pick up the mess.

Ed Ward: The City of San Clemente projects a budget deficit in the 2019/2020 fiscal year for the first time in many years. This requires a high-level of fiscal pragmatism coupled with responsible revenue growth to ensure our city’s continued viability and enviable AAA Bond rating. The city will need to stay mindful of its current obligations while considering the impact of any incremental obligations in future year’s projected fiscal plans.

Kathy Ward: Public organizations have gone back to 2% for new hires from the increase of 3% given to employees before reality set in with the stock market crash of 2008. Giving 3% was unsustainable and modifying that benefit will help with future costs. When cities have windfalls, they should make payments towards their future pension obligations in order to reduce their future costs.

Question 5: On the ballot this November, voters will be asked to decide on whether to repeal the recently enacted increase to the state gas tax. What is your position on the gas tax?

Dan Bane: No response

Don Brown: No response

Wayne Eggleston: Taxes of this nature should always be on the ballot as they affect everyone who drives a car. The State representatives should not pass this without voter approval. Finally it is on the ballot. While maintenance of our roads is important, the voters need to approve or disapprove this measure.

Laura Ferguson: No response

Gene James: The gas tax increase does not go to fix roads and it will increase annually. The cost to a family will be an additional $800 annually. Shortly, we will be paying more than $2.00 a gallon in taxes. How is this money being is used? Certainly, not to repair roads; the additional tax will be used to fund the latest folly from Sacramento. I am in favor of Repealing the Gas Tax.

Jackson Hinkle: No response

Mikii Rathmann: No response

Jake Rybczyk: I believe the gas tax has not been administrated long enough for the entire effect of it to be measured. I do support the initiative to repeal it though, as I think this is, the peoples’ way to use their voice and opposition to legislation they don’t feel represented on.

Ed Ward: San Clemente City Council, obviously, has no jurisdiction/oversight in this area. As a citizen, while I don’t enjoy paying more for fuel than residents in neighboring states, I do recognize the urgent need to repair our ailing roads, bridges and fund further expansion of Public Transportation.

Kathy Ward: California has money to fix our roads but instead the money is diverted to pay for other things. Senate Republicans proffered a budget of $7.8 billion to fix our roads without raising taxes. The state should be paying to fix our roads instead of imposing a new tax to do so.

Question 6: The high cost of housing in California has spurred increased interest in rent control. On the ballot this November is Proposition 10, which would repeal the Costa-Hawkins Act. What are your thoughts on rent control?

Dan Bane: No response

Don Brown: No response

Wayne Eggleston: Market supply and demand is the over-riding issue here. Government putting controls on rents causes developers to think twice about building more housing supply. The main issue here is construction of affordable housing and giving incentives for builders to build so there is a market supply for the demand for affordable housing.

Laura Ferguson: No response

Gene James: Rent control does not work and in fact it creates a larger problem. Investors simply will not invest in the development of new properties nor will landlords be inclined to improve existing properties. The law of unintended consequences will occur with a shrinkage of housing just when we the need for an increase in housing units.

Jackson Hinkle: No response

Mikii Rathmann: No response

Jake Rybczyk: I believe rent control is essential to have in environments threatened by symptoms caused by gentrification. A middle-class family should be able to retain their money and home with promise for a future for where they live. I think rent control is best controlled by a board made up of community leaders.

Ed Ward: While I support greater local control on this issue, I do believe that a full repeal is not the solution required for this complex issue.

Kathy Ward: No public official can say they care about affordable housing if they haven’t done anything to control vacation rentals in their city. Monetizing housing put basic housing principles aside and caused rents to artificially increase to a point tenants could no longer afford it. If commercial lodging is limited in our neighborhoods, I would hope rents would stabilize as more units are available, but if not, I would consider studying options that stabilize rent.

Question 7: Proposition 64 authorizes the legalization of marijuana, while granting local jurisdictions the authority to approve or deny certain marijuana-related businesses. What are your thoughts on marijuana legalization to date and what do you think of your own community’s policies on marijuana?

Dan Bane: No response

Don Brown: No response

Wayne Eggleston: San Clemente has very strict control on the distribution and sale of marijuana which is good. Residents have the ability to grow in their homes a maximum of six plants. We need to have more enlightened views when it comes for strictly medical uses that have proven to help in a variety of medical issues.

Laura Ferguson: No response

Gene James: Prop 64 is the law; I did not vote for it and only time will tell if it was the right call by the voters. It is much too early to measure the effects of the legalization of marijuana on San Clemente. With that said, I am not in favor of marijuana-related businesses in San Clemente.

Jackson Hinkle: No response

Mikii Rathmann: No response

Jake Rybczyk: I think Marijuana is settled in California as a legal and obtainable drug which one can have access to where ever in the state. Where ever medical or recreational marijuana is sold, massive profits are gained. I believe San Clemente should take advantage of the situation, by allowing and taxing medical marijuana businesses in the city. But I believe this should be on the ballot and brought forth to the people.

Ed Ward: In general I support legalization actions to date, however, I believe that continual monitoring of this issue is prudent and essential. Similarly, I support the City of San Clemente’s current positions on cultivation and cannabis dispensaries. That being said, this is an evolving social/political issue which requires ongoing review and openness to ensure that the city balances civil liberties with resident opinions and concerns.

Kathy Ward: I am very concerned that California has legalized marijuana without all policies and procedures in place. I chose not to allow these businesses in my city because I felt the legalization was too sudden and all impacts were not fully understood. I think this decision was prudent to protect the city’s discretionary rights and to minimize impacts to public safety.

Question 8: Senate Bill 54 limits the role of state and local law enforcement in enforcing federal immigration laws. The law has drawn legal challenges from some localities which want the flexibility to work with the federal government. What do you think of SB54?

Dan Bane: No response

Don Brown: No response

Wayne Eggleston: Police departments need to work closely with Federal law enforcement for those who are not citizens and have serious criminal records. To me that is just basic common sense.

Laura Ferguson: No response

Gene James: SB 54 endangers our communities by not cooperating with the Federal government in the removal of the undocumented who have felony convictions. I could not disagree more with SB 54. As a City Council Member, I would do everything in my power to get SB 54 reversed. As someone who served his country in uniform for 20 years, I am offended our state refuses to recognize the strategic importance of our national borders and security.

Jackson Hinkle: No response

Mikii Rathmann: No response

Jake Rybczyk: I think SB54 protects Californians and our communities. I would work with the state as long as SB54 is considered legal and not join the Trump lawsuit against the state. I think a community works best when the law enforcement is trained well, knows the community and can be trusted. Any person living in my city should feel that from the police at all times.

Ed Ward: Given the current political climate and polarization on this issue, I support SB54.

Kathy Ward: I support following federal laws. Our city has no role in immigration enforcement whatsoever so it is purely symbolic or political to make a statement about sanctuary laws imposed by our state. The Department of Justice is suing California over SB54 and that is the proper venue for this issue to be heard.

 

 

 

 

 

Aliso Beach berm wasn’t breached over summer for first time in decade, thanks to education, enforcement

  • The berm at Aliso Beach in Laguna Beach on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 separates the ocean, left, from the creek, right, that loaded with metropolitan overflow. For the very first time in decades, the berm was not breached for the whole summertime making it more secure for beachgoers and minimizing metropolitan runoff into the ocean by half. (Picture by Leonard Ortiz, Orange Region Register/SCNG).

  • The creek at Aliso Coastline in Laguna Coastline on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 full of contaminated water from metropolitan drainage. For the very first time in decades, the berm was not breached for the entire summer season making it safer for beachgoers and reducing overflow right into the ocean by half. (Picture by Leonard Ortiz, Orange Area Register/SCNG).

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  • Jinger Wallace, left, and Mike Beanan are with the caution indicators near the creek at Aliso Coastline in Laguna Beach on Wednesday, October 10, 2018. Wallace and Beanan have actually played a significant duty in helping neighborhood water companies and also the county enlighten upstream communities on what they can do to minimize drainage from their communities. (Image by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG).

  • Jason Youthful, lifeguard principal for OC Lifeguards is shown at Aliso Coastline in Laguna Beach on Wednesday, October 10, 2018. “Practically the whole summertime, the berm was never ever breached,” stated Young. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG).

  • An indicator at Aliso Beach in Laguna Coastline on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 advises beachgoers not to enter the creek as a result of germs including city overflow. (Picture by Leonard Ortiz, Orange Area Register/SCNG).

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LAGUNA BEACH &http://#8212; &http://#8212; Sunlight umbrellas and beach towels spread out throughout a vast sand berm at the mouth of Aliso Creek, at Aliso Coastline, have actually been common views from Coast Freeway for the last several months. But it wasn’t something sea environmentalists or lifeguards saw a lot of over the years prior.

” Practically the entire summer season, the berm was never breached,” claimed Jason Young, lifeguard chief for OC Lifeguards, the firm that keeps watch over coastlines from Aliso in Laguna Coastline to Poche Beach on the border of Dana Point and San Clemente. “Initial time in my memory where we’ve had an entire summer season go by without the berm breaching.”

Not only did water never ever make its method naturally from Aliso Creek into the sea, yet OC Lifeguards maintained close look for any person attempting to dig culverts to allow the water retreat.

That, in addition to reduced overflow from inland areas and possible sand swells that shifted a lot more sand to the mouth of the creek, helped to produce among the biggest berms on the coastline in 4 decades. The sand berm has to do with 50 feet vast and also three feet above water level.

Unlawful breaching by beachgoers has been a continuous problem in years past, said Mike Beanan, founder of the Laguna Bluebelt Coalition, an ocean campaigning for group devoted to securing Laguna’s state-declared Marine Protected Location.

” When the thrill of water &http://#8212; &http://#8212; 500 million gallons &http://#8212; &http://#8212; discharges and also hits the browse, it creates a standing wave at the mouth of the creek,” he claimed.

Lifeguards are helped by OC Parks rangers and Laguna Coastline Cops Department Beach Patrol in keeping an eye on the berm. And also OC Parks spokeswoman Marissa O’Neil said the public worked together with cautions; no citations were released over the summer season.

People excavating out the berm has actually been a decades-long problem for Young and his lifeguards.

” We understand it will occur when the creek is complete,” he stated. “Each time it occurs, it develops a public security issue and also noticeable water top quality issue. We have indications published to avoid call with the creek water as well as metropolitan overflow. The various other is speed &http://#8212; &http://#8212; it creates a river with high rate and also creates a substantial rip current. Everyone there goes to risk. It suffices to create three- as well as four-foot rapids as well as a slit existing that goes a number of hundred feet out to sea.”

Virtually 70 percent of OC Lifeguard rescues at Aliso Beach come from the location where the berm meets the ocean. Some novice swimmers see the still water of the creek as more secure than the ocean swells, Young said, however they do not understand the risks of metropolitan runoff or the depth of the creek. Even when the berm isn’t breached, the area’s geography positions a risk of mini tear currents.

OC Lifeguards this summer season rescued 345 individuals, made 24,063 preventative get in touches with and also informed 3,179 people about region legislations at Aliso Coastline.

Inland understanding

Jinger Wallace, who co-founded Laguna Bluebelt, has been a supporter for raised education within inland areas along the creek. In February 2017, she composed a grant laying out actions to lower drainage in a specific area where it could be gauged.

” I got so sick of listening to individuals claim there is absolutely nothing we can do (concerning the runoff in Aliso Creek),” she claimed. “I just couldn’t think we could not think of a means to determine it. I wager people inland care about the sea and don’t intend to pollute it. I thought it was unfair that inland communities were condemned.”

Wallace partnered with Grant Sharp, manager of the South Orange County Landmark Monitoring Area, part of OC Public Functions, who used flow information collected over a two-week duration at numerous outfalls within South Orange County to prioritize where sources ought to be concentrated to resolve urban overflow in completely dry climate.

One area Sharp identified was an outfall in Aliso Viejo, near Aliso Viejo and also Moulton parkways. Wallace included Sharp’s data to her give proposition as well as in 2 weeks had assistance from Moulton Niguel Water District for a $12,000 education program.

Education results in minimized run-off

As part of the water district’s reaction to the drought, the agency developed a program to examine water use, stated Drew Atwater, Moulton’s supervisor of planning. The company collaborated with the region to recognize areas adding to city run-off and also coordinated with the region and the cities of Aliso Viejo, Dana Point, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, and Goal Viejo, together with environmental organizations consisting of the Laguna Bluebelt as well as OC Coastkeeper.

Funding for the program comes from Moulton Niguel consumers that use more than their independently computed water budget plan, Atwater stated.

In loss 2017, the water district, Laguna Bluebelt and also the Region of Orange introduced an educational program which includes neighborhood online forums for property owners organization boards and also landscape professionals. Details concentrates on landscape design, the policy of water flow, how to measure water usage as well as exactly how to produce native gardens.

Current screening shows that the amount of water flow has actually been decreased given that the education and learning method went right into place.

” The efforts are functioning,” Sharp said. “We are seeing an overall decrease in circulation and we desire to maintain it by doing this. This is a favorable change the means the berm is remaining in location in the summer season but we still have a lengthy means to go. We wish to get to the point where we remove flow in completely dry weather. If you see a flow in completely dry weather, you’ve reached ask yourself, &http://#8216;&http://#8216; Why?’ That’s the actions modification we’re trying to influence.”

Education and learning initiatives are continuing and also area workshops are scheduled in Laguna Niguel as well as Mission Viejo via completion of the year.

” I assume it’s magnificent,” Wallace said. “We’re coming together as well as ultimately, finally, making some quantifiable adjustment in the amount of urban overflow reaching the sea.”